Artificial intelligence, cybersecurity and beyond

artificial intelligence, government, securityBy Kevin Shaker, senior analyst

Artificial intelligence has been making headway in the IT sector with a focus on cybersecurity. Spending on AI and machine learning, which helps make AI possible, will grow from $12 billion in 2017 to $57.6 billion by 2021, according to IDC.

And it’s starting to get the attention of federal, state and local government IT personnel who see it as a way to increase and optimize automation for enhanced judgment and cost reduction.

The largest opportunity for AI is cybersecurity. Government agencies spend significant resources and people hours adapting to cyber threats while hacker technology becomes even more persistent and evolving. This is the wild west with cybersecurity and the trick is to stay one step ahead of malware, spyware and viruses that aim to corrupt and compromise sensitive processes and data.

Read more of this post

Cloud opportunities to pursue right now at CBP

cloud, IT, migrationBy Kevin Shaker, senior analyst

In recent years, cloud services and cloud migration opportunities have become a large IT push for agencies that want to lower their hardware costs and hire more skilled workers across the civilian landscape. Larger agencies by nature take longer to meet cloud progress milestones due to their robust infrastructure and trickier siloed mission systems and applications.

One civilian agency starting its cloud journey is within the Department of Homeland Security, the largest funded sub-agency. U.S. Customs and Border Protection wants to push a large portion of its IT to the cloud.

On February 28, CBP released an RFI that asks for help migrating its applications out of its Office of Information Technology’s National Data Center in Springfield, Va., to cloud services. The RFI submissions are due by April 16, which means there is still time to get involved if you have cloud implementation technology.

Read more of this post

How to help government with its biggest cloud hurdles

cloud, IT, governmentBy Kevin Shaker, senior analyst

Cloud infrastructure is growing rapidly in the public sector, with a compound growth rate exceeding 29 percent. This is a trend that will continue as government accelerates its breadth of technological viability to match the innovative private sector.

While most agencies’ IT leaders have said cloud architecture is vital to mission success, there are difficulties in determining how this technology should be managed and which applications can be migrated and to which cloud environments.

We delved into this issue at immixGroup’s recent Government IT Sales Summit where industry and federal leaders discussed the challenges and advantages of federal cloud migration and routes to accelerate agency transformation.

Here are some of the concerns and recommendations:

Read more of this post

IoT snapshot: the potential and the risks

By Kevin Shaker, senior analyst

During immixGroup’s 4th annual Government IT Sales Summit, government and industry IT leaders addressed what’s under the IoT umbrella and how public sector enterprises are using these tools now.

Here are some highlights of the IoT snapshot: The potential and the risks panel:

Where in this ecosystem should our partners and suppliers spend most of their time to bring the most value to their customers?

If you look at IT versus IoT, the world of IT was clients and servers. The client was relatively smart ­– your phones, tablets, PCs – so it balanced the IT issue between the client and the server. Now that we’re progressing into more IoT, the challenge is that the endpoint node is going to be really dumb; it’s not going to have a lot of processing power or memory. We end up with this new thing called a gateway, and that gateway is where we’ll control nodes, processing and the edge compute work, and this is the new platform from which IoT will work on.

Read more of this post

The 2 civilian trends you need to know

Chris Wiedemann

federal budget, civilianBy Chris Wiedemann, consultant, and Kevin Shaker, senior analyst

The president’s FY18 budget request cuts funding to every civilian agency. The good news is that Congress will not entirely approve the spending decreases, but unfortunately, we’ll live in a budget-constrained environment for the next few fiscal years. The IT industry will need to help civilian agencies figure out how to keep systems modernizing.

You’ll hear all about the new FY18 challenges and trends facing companies that sell technology to civilian agencies at the 4th annual Government IT Sales Summit on Nov. 16 in Reston, VA. Here’s a look at two big trends we’ll be discussing:

Read more of this post

This tech is not scary to government

converged, infrastructureBy Kevin Shaker, senior analyst

As government agencies make progress in eliminating siloed data centers and systems, the market for connected and hyper-converged technology is getting stronger.

Agencies are looking for suppliers that can help systems runs more efficiently and faster, so connected technologies that aid in virtualization, storage and networking will be the emphasized technologies for growth in FY18. The government spent more than $1.2 billion on connected technologies in FY17.

What has been driving the push toward connected and hyper-converged technology are regulations such as the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative, the Data Center Optimization Initiative and Cloud First policies. These policies have been tremendously effective at reducing costs from legacy stovepiped IT while streamlining functionality by encouraging purchasing of cutting-edge integration and converged systems.

Here are examples of how the government is utilizing hyper-converged platforms:

Read more of this post

The latest on the Social Security Administration’s IT needs

business and operations, infrastructure, social security administrationBy Kevin Shaker, senior analyst

Finding backend technology opportunities in the government has been tricky in recent years as agencies continue to push their environments toward shared services and Internet-as-a-Service.

However, the Social Security Administration (SSA) is one of the few civilian agencies that’s a viable target in the upcoming fiscal year for companies that offer infrastructure and infrastructure support technologies.

Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: