Cloud or On-Premises? Government Can Have Both

By Ray Miles, Strategic Account Executive

Despite the growth and adoption of public clouds in government, a large majority of their applications remain outside and are maintained on-premises. As the evolution of cloud continues, government customers are faced with making the difficult decisions about which remaining applications should be placed in the cloud and which ones should remain on-premises.

Why remain on-premises?

There are many reasons for keeping applications and data on-premises, including application entanglement, data accessibility and resilience, security and compliance, unpredictable costs, exorbitant egress fees and at times the inability to capitalize on information everywhere.

The next phase of “Cloud First” will require an approach that enables government to innovate and modernize all of their applications and workloads, including those at the edge and on-premises. Organizations will need to connect all of their applications and data to devices to support employees and their customers — and meet their mission-critical objectives.

It is becoming even more complex as environments are starting to incorporate newer technologies for development operations, container management, machine learning operations, virtual machines, storage, high performance computing, data protection and networking to the edge. Read more of this post

Getting Started With OTAs (Part 2 of 2)

By Troy Fortune, VP and General Manager

In my previous blog I talked about how OTAs can offer real advantages to both government agencies and suppliers. This blog provides more information about the types of OTAs and when they should be used. We also provide tips on how to assist your potential customers in the process.

There are three categories of OTAs and it’s important for you to know how and when they’re used.

  1. Research OTAs (also known as “original” or science and technology OTAs) are for basic, applied and advanced research projects. These OTs are intended to spur dual-use research and development. Companies can take advantage of economies of scale without the burden of government regulatory overhead.
  2. Prototype OTAs are authorized for acquiring prototype capabilities and allowing those prototypes to transition into Production OTAs. Both dual-use and defense-specific projects are encouraged. Successful Prototype OTAs streamline the transition into follow-on production without competition. They also reduce the possibility of a future protest.
  3. Production OTAs are authorized as noncompetitive, follow-on OTAs to a Prototype OT agreement that was competitively awarded and successfully completed. Under this statute, advanced consideration is required, and notice is to be made of the potential for a project to go into production.

Read more of this post

Getting Started With OTAs (Part 1 of 2)

By Troy Fortune, VP and General Manager

An OTA (Other Transaction Authority) can be a powerful alternative to a traditional contract vehicle. OTAs have been in use for years but they have become more popular since Congress relaxed rules and restrictions. In fact, Bloomberg reports that government spending on OTAs increased almost eight-fold from FY15-FY19, from $1B to $7.8B. This includes all OTAs, not just for information technology solutions.

OTAs can provide a rapid way to deliver solutions the government needs. This can be an especially valuable tool for government to acquire technology from companies that may offer cutting edge or emerging technologies but are not set up to do business with the government.

The speed with which OTAs can be executed is a real benefit. On its website, DOD cited  the example of how the Air Mobility Command was able to “take a requirement and turn it into a product in just 95 days, when the process might normally take more than a year to complete.”

Many of our suppliers have asked for our help in understanding how OTAs work and how to navigate the process. Here is some basic information to get you thinking about whether or not this might be something your company should pursue. Read more of this post

Technology to Aid State Contact Tracing Efforts

By Rachel Eckert, SLED Manager

States are increasingly leveraging technology to help state and local officials trace and contain virus outbreaks – and each state seems to be taking a different approach. Everything from calls and texts to apps and online forms is being used. Patient contact tracing methods vary widely across the states — from centralized tracing by state health departments to decentralized methods that rely on calls and texts sent by individual local health departments.

What’s common is the need for case-management systems that manage interactions and follow-up activities. These systems organize information that contact tracers collect through their outreach, as well as information entered through online portals by citizens themselves.

Data collected by these case management systems can help states identify the total number of cases, hospitalizations, etc., by geography. These systems are typically robust tools that provide everything from analytical dashboards to mass communication tools. But there is so much more states can do with the data by integrating their case management systems with other state-based eligibility and aid systems, such as Medicaid management information systems or unemployment insurance systems — all while protecting sensitive patient information. Read more of this post

Two New Sales Opportunities at Commerce That Are NOT Census-Related

By Jessica Parks, Market Intelligence Analyst

Don’t let the Department of Commerce’s understandable focus on the 2020 Census distract you from other sales opportunities within the cabinet-level agency. The need for better data analytics is opening up initiatives at two of its sub-agencies, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Fundamentally, both USPTO and NOAA have requirements around the processing, management and analysis of large volumes of data. If your technology can help them meet these requirements, you will have a foot in the door for a procurement you and your competitors may otherwise have missed.   Read more of this post

Beyond Border Security: FY21 Trade-Related Opportunities at CBP

By Jessica Parks, Analyst

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), under the Department of Homeland Security, is widely known as the organization that secures our nation’s borders, but they also regulate goods entering and leaving the country through the Office of Trade (OT).

CBP receives almost 30% of the DHS IT budget, and while it’s always looking to enhance the border infrastructure, there are a few major trade-focused technology programs that have been moving forward with big plans of their own. Read on to learn what those programs are and what they’re looking for. Read more of this post

What You Need to Know About Changes to the Army CIO/G-6

By the end of August, the Army will split the chief information officer (CIO/G-6) role into two separate positions — CIO and Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS) of the G-6. Each role will have separate headquarters, each with its own supporting organization. In terms of staffing the new organizations, the Army is primarily focused on utilizing the resources and funding that they currently have. As a result, a major shift in new names and faces is not anticipated at this time.

The CIO Role

Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, the current CIO/G-6, will maintain his role until he moves on to his next assignment. Upon his transition, when that comes, the new CIO will be another three-star general and a member of the secretariat.   Read more of this post

Back to School or Not? Options Abound

By Charles Castelly, SLED Analyst

With the expected return of students back to school in the fall, most counties are trying to figure out the best way to facilitate a safe and orderly process.

School systems are facing many challenges right now — the first being how to keep social distancing. Secondly, they will need to manage remote learning environments — and find a way to pay for new technologies that are required to support them.

Lots of decisions still need to be made and school systems are using all available resources to resolve outstanding issues — and they are reaching out to parents for their input.  Read more of this post

Military Space Programs Emerge as a Top Priority in 2021

Lloyd McCoy Jr.

By Lloyd McCoy, Market Intelligence Manager

While passage of the 2021 budget is still months away, Congress and the White House are busy crafting the final version of the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act. This is the most important budget document for the Department of Defense as it establishes funding levels and sets the policies under which money will be spent. As such, it’s a reliable barometer for DOD priorities in the next year or two.

There’s a clear consensus emerging between the Administration and Congress on space as a high priority and the upcoming NDAA will call for a strengthened role in space for our military. More specifically, acquiring the infrastructure and technologies that will further development of space-based assets and capabilities will be spelled out.

Let’s look at where we expect IT solutions to be most needed in the space domain:  Read more of this post

Cybersecurity Spending Continues in State Government

By Rachel Eckert, SLED Manager

By now, most of us are aware of the budgetary restrictions many states will be under due to reduced revenue collections. Arkansas will experience cuts of about $250 million in the next fiscal year. Utah could see budget cuts up to 10%, while Vermont may see budget cuts of up to 25%. This will most likely restrict the number of new projects, but one area many state CIOs expressed continued support for is cybersecurity.

During recent round table discussions hosted by NASCIO, budgets and budget cuts were top of mind for CIOs as they shared top priorities for the coming fiscal year. Many stated that they were continuing with their initiatives as best they could, balancing funding with requirements. Initiatives include projects like service digitization, automation, customer relationship management, and in many cases, improving cybersecurity frameworks.

Some states are planning to leverage funding they receive through the CARES Act for technology, while others are trying to find alternative ways to finance new and ongoing initiatives alike. Despite budget cuts, there is one area continuing to receive CIO attention — cybersecurity. Here’s a snapshot of what’s happening across the country:  Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: