Will AI be able to stop cybercrime?

cybersecurity, artificial intelligenceLloyd McCoy Jr.Real talk is finally starting on how to actually implement proactive cyber defense. We have to stop taking it on the chin from bad actors who find cyber intrusion and electronic warfare relatively simple and free from consequence.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is being touted as the next go-to technology for understanding potential threats in nearly every theater of war—from cybercrime to electronic warfare.

At a recent forum for government IT professionals, Ardisson Lyons of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) said using standardized cloud-based platforms can improve big data analysis and consumption. An “Intelligent Simulation Center” can help immerse decision-makers in the information in a dynamic way.

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Here are the top 5 public sector tech trends for FY18

Chris WiedemannFY18, government, ITBy Chris Wiedemann, consultant

There are only two days left in the federal government’s 2017 fiscal year. Are you ready for 2018?

While we still don’t know the amounts for federal IT budgets, we do know the government IT sector is a healthy one at around $80 billion a year. Add in state and local governments and educational institutions and you have a market valued at more than $180 billion.

Here are the five government trends we’re tracking for 2018:

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Make crucial connections at this year’s Summit

Government IT Sales Summit

By Rita Walston, senior director, marketing programs

When business leaders talk about what contributes to their company’s success, they often point to the importance of strong relationships in their industry. In the government IT ecosystem, having strong connections with channel partners, tech suppliers and government end-users is crucial for growing revenue.

That’s why the theme for our 4th Annual Government IT Sales Summit is “Crucial Connections.” Taking place Nov. 16, 2017, in Reston, VA, this year’s Summit will help make those crucial connections between top solution providers, IT manufacturers, systems integrators and resellers.

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Can data save health IT security?

Lloyd McCoy Jr.By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

The military’s next battlefield could be moving to a hospital bed.

With the growth of new technologies like the internet of things in health care, the security of health IT systems is becoming more at risk. Another challenge is that medical devices are already several years old by the time they’re in active use in the Military Health System.

So could better use of data and analytics help make these systems more secure?

The military health system has a wealth of data and health IT professionals need to harness it to create business and medical intelligence. We don’t need systems to tell us what already happened, but to predict how to best use and position our medical resources to cater to service members and their families.

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When will CYBERCOM Split from NSA?

As soon as Congress passed the FY17 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the clock began to tick on CYBERCOM’s elevation to a fully-fledged combatant command.

The NDAA included a clause that mandated CYBERCOM’s elevation to full COCOM status, although there are a few provisions that give us a clue as to when that may occur. Before CYBERCOM can be formally split from Strategic Command, it must reach full operating capability and Congress must approve of CYBERCOM’s readiness.

So what does that mean for the IT industry? With CYBERCOM’s rising and sizeable budget, there’s a lot of opportunity for cybersecurity vendors. But first it’s important to understand what needs to happen for CYBERCOM to split from STRATCOM.

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Government’s answer to cybersecurity is the most simple and most complicated

Lloyd McCoy Jr.cybersecurity, information sharingBy Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

The key to tackling cybersecurity threats in government is a simple lesson most of us learned in preschool: how to share.

Information sharing among federal departments could be the answer to combating cyberattacks. But the big question is whether the Department of Defense and other agencies can share enough.

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New cyber authorities in new DHS legislation

Tom O'Keefecybersecurity, department of homeland securityBy Tom O’Keefe, consultant

A bill that has just made its way through the House would finally reauthorize the Department of Homeland Security, which has only been authorized once, in 2002.

There are several cyber provisions included in the House bill, which could mean a lot of opportunity for cybersecurity vendors if it ends up passing in the Senate (where it has, unfortunately, stalled before). But there’s a good chance that even if the bill doesn’t pass, we’ll see some of the additional authorities and responsibilities making their way to DHS components anyway.

Most of the specific provisions in the bill of interest here are ones that require certain components to own responsibility for cybersecurity of various locations. For example, the Transportation Security Administration would be responsible for assessing the cybersecurity of aviation systems, including airports and airlines, developing an information sharing project across the airline industry and assessing the vulnerabilities of the systems that house TSA PreCheck.

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