How and where to do business in the Navy: Part II

Lloyd McCoy Jr.By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

The Marine Corps will utilize a major portion of Navy’s IT budget for everything from cyber and incident response tools to data visualization and analytics.Here is part II of our breakdown of the Navy’s IT focus areas through FY18 and the best ways the private sector can generate new leads. (If you missed part I, click here.)

The Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) is the acquisition command for the U.S. Marine Corps. In my conversations with the service, a consistent refrain is that it wants to take capabilities that exist on a camp or garrison to the battlefield. So the Marine Corps is looking for technologies that are lightweight, flexible and that can be used at the lowest levels.

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How and where to do business in the Navy: Part I

Lloyd McCoy Jr.

By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

One of the biggest priorities of the Trump administration is a boost to the Department of Defense budget, specifically a substantial expansion of the Navy’s fleet. While a detailed FY18 budget is forthcoming, Navy commanders and program managers have recently been vocal about their priorities.

In this two-part series, I’ll break down the major insertion points within Navy and the Marine Corps and highlight what matters to the tech community, specifically the major drivers for IT spending through FY18.

First, let’s explore some of the commands and program offices that handle everything from aviation to information warfare.

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5 DHS opportunities in the president’s proposed budget

Tom O'KeefeBy Tom O’Keefe, consultant

One of the few civilian agencies that likely won’t have its budget cut is the Department of Homeland Security. What’s less clear is exactly how the funding breaks down for DHS components.

The Trump administration’s plan to direct more funds to Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement by heavily reducing the budgets of the U.S. Coast Guard, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Transportation Security Administration are likely non-starters for congressional appropriators.

However, looking at the FY17 budget amendment and the FY18 budget request, we can get an idea of where some additional technology opportunities might appear at the department. The FY17 budget amendment requests $3 billion extra for DHS, with a third of that going to CBP to begin construction of the border wall. The FY18 “skinny” budget has a few more clues for where we might see increased investment at DHS:

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What government needs to do to speed up cyber defenses

Lloyd McCoy Jr.By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

Two cyber breaches at the Office of Personnel Management in 2015 prompted the federal government to move quickly to award $500 million worth of government-wide BPAs for identity monitoring and data breach response and protection services.

It begs the question of where that money was before the problem.

More problems like this are increasingly likely as we all rely on more IT infrastructures that may not be up to the challenge of increased use. Down the road, better coordination between tech vendors and buyers before the acquisition process will be able to stem the cyber tide. But what do we do in the meantime with what we have now?

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Can collaboration save us from cyber attacks?

By Tim Larkins, director of Market Intelligence

By 2020, businesses will experience $3 trillion in economic loss due to cyber attacks globally. Seventy-four percent of the world’s businesses expect to be hacked this year. If that’s not a crisis, I don’t know what is.

If you were one of 45,000 people who attended the RSA conference last month in San Francisco, you likely picked up on a few common themes related to this cyber crisis. Thought leaders and industry experts seemed to agree that we need more collaboration between companies, governments and associations in developing standards, policies and regulations for both cybersecurity and the internet of things.  We need more threat intelligence sharing, and some even advocated for creating an entire government agency dedicated to cybersecurity and IoT.

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DOD and IoT: 2 ways industry can help right now

Stephanie Meloni_65x85By Stephanie Meloni, consultant

If you’ve been attending industry events and keeping up with the news, you’ve surely been hearing buzz about the internet of things (IoT).

And if the DOD is part of your sales territory, you’re probably hearing how important it is to get IoT right, particularly when it comes to securing connected devices. But there hasn’t been a lot of action behind those words.

Many civilian agencies like the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Commerce have already released strategic documents and plans for IoT, but the Department of Defense has yet to release an official strategy.

Even so, government customers across DOD are giving thought as to how to handle IoT, and in some ways, are already implementing projects. So how can technology companies get involved as this trend continues to pick up steam?

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When deception is a good thing

Silhouette of a hacker with binary codes on background

nick-mirabile-resized2By Nick Mirabile, director of cybersecurity

In 2013, a pro-Assad group known as the Syrian Electronic Army hacked into the Associated Press’ Twitter account and broadcast a fake report about explosions at the White House. It caused the Dow Jones industrial average to drop nearly 150 points, erasing $136 billion in market value.

This is cyber deception in action. Cyber attackers have long embraced deception with tactics such as social engineering help-desk employees to install Trojans or obtain users’ credentials. If deception can be used to attack, can it also be used in cyber defense?

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