Yes, the Public Sector Is Embracing IoT!

By Tim Larkins, director, market intelligence

Most analysts agree that by 2021, over 20 billion Internet-connected devices worldwide will make up a market for the Internet of Things (IoT) worth over $2.5 trillion. That means a huge market opportunity for vendors providing technology at every point — from the user device to the platform itself.

In a nutshell, IoT allows devices to link and exchange data. It’s not a discrete technology like business applications or infrastructure or even cybersecurity. It’s more like a wrapper around all other technologies and is comprised of five major elements:

  • The Edge: The devices, nodes and sensors actually collecting data
  • The Gateway: Either a physical device or software that allows data to flow from the edge to the platform
  • The IoT Platform: The operating environment, storage, computing power and development tools that receive data from the gateway
  • Software Applications: Programs that let users solve business problems, working with data stored in the IoT platform
  • Cybersecurity: The tools that protect all the nodes/sensors/devices at the edge and data transmitted through the gateway, platform, all the way to the user

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DATA Act: Open for Business?

Stephanie Headshot 65x85by Stephanie Meloni, Senior Analyst

On April 10, 2014, the Senate (unanimously!) passed the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act (DATA Act). The bill would require the government to standardize and publish financial management, procurement, and related data in electronic formats that can be easily accessed by the public. Open data will give our industry new insights into federal spending, and potentially new business opportunities. The House is expected to vote on the bill later this month, where it is expected to pass quickly.

The DATA Act will be the most powerful transparency mandate since the passage of the Freedom of Information Act in 1966. The goal of the bill is to publish the executive branch’s entire spending portfolio as standardized open data.  The DATA Act will be used to provide visibility into wasteful spending and duplicative programs.

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