Baseball, Beaches, Budget

tim larkins small pic. 67x84BaseballBeachBudget_051116By Tim Larkins, Market Intelligence Director

If you’re fixed on baseball and beach weather, you need to switch gears. Pennant races and temperatures aren’t the only things that start to heat up come spring.
April, May, and June are prime budget planning months for federal agencies.

As you read this, program managers are working tirelessly to spend their FY16 money, to budget for the spending of their FY17 money, and make requests for FY18 money.

Which means it’s time to fire up conversations around requirements, unsolicited proposals, and unfunded requests. Getting an early foot in the door in the budget planning process is key to selling technology to the government, and ensuring that technology requirements align to your solutions is the best way to secure business down the road.

Read more of this post

FY16 Budget Forecast

US Flag, Capitol Building and MoneyThe Senate and the House passed a Continuing Resolution (CR) today, which the President can sign by midnight to fund government at FY15 levels through December 11.  What happens after the December 11 deadline is up in the air, but we’ll either see more CRs for the rest of the year, or an omnibus (like what we had in FY15).

First, let’s cover some budget scenarios:

  • Full Budget
    12 appropriations bills passed by the House and Senate and signed by the President by October 1 appropriating funds to each of the government agencies. These appropriations bills combine for over 20,000 pages of text and provide significant clarity from Congress on how money should be spentThis hasn’t happened since 2008.
  • Omnibus
     Twelve appropriations bills are consolidated into 1.  Agencies do receive new funding levels for the year and new programs can start, but the bill is significantly shorter (roughly 2,000 pages, compared to the 20,000 pages of the full budget) and lacks the direction from Congress on how the money should be spent.  FY15 ended on an omnibus.
  • CROmnibus
    A combination of a CR and an omnibus – funding some agencies at new levels for the fiscal year, while other agencies are dependent upon prior year spending levels.
  • Continuing Resolution (CR)
    Appropriations bills were not passed and new budget levels cannot be agreed upon in Congress.  A CR is a stopgap measure allowing the government to remain open and funded, but at the prior year’s spending levels, and no new programs can be started.
  • Shutdown
    Congress can’t agree on any aspect of funding, and all non-essential governmental functions are suspended until a budget can be reached.

Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: