Tracking government “openness” changes in contracting

By Jenni Taylor, manager, government programs and contracts

Federal contracting officers are moving towards more openness in procurement, which is a step forward in the cumbersome federal procurement process, according to Michael Fischetti, executive director of the National Contract Management Association.

Fischetti’s remarks came during a panel discussion at our recent Government IT Sales Summit, titled “Without a Contract, There Is No Deal: Updates on Contracts and Procurement.”

Contracting problems occur in government because contract professionals “are at the end of a long chain” of requirements definitions, budget analysis, time, coordination and approvals that Fischetti says often have nothing to do with requirements themselves. Despite that long process, Fischetti added that the federal procurement generally works free of political intervention.

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President signs online marketplaces bill—now what?

 By Jeff Ellinpgovernment procurementort, division counsel, and Steve Charles, co-founder

The FY18 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), signed by President Trump earlier this

month, not only authorizes appropriations for the Department of Defense and military services, but it also includes a provision that will change the way the private sector sells many commercial products to the federal government. It could have a dramatic effect on future supplier go-to-market plans.

As the General Services Administration develops its plan to implement this legislation, the time is now for OEMs to speak up about how they want to see this part of their public sector channel evolve. The next opportunity will be Jan. 9 at GSA’s first public meeting on this issue. But first, a little bit on the impact of this change.

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What is the GSA?

By Chris Wiedemann, consultant

Any company that’s in government contracting or interested in doing business in the public sector should be familiar with the General Services Administration.

If you’ve been following my “What is…?” series, you’ve learned some of the basics of government contracting and knowing the GSA is yet another rung on the ladder.

GSA primarily provides office space for government employees by constructing, managing and preserving government buildings and by leasing and managing commercial real estate. In fact, GSA is the largest landlord in the country.

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What You Need to Know About GSA’s New Cyber SINs

Steve Headshot 65 x 85gsasins_091416By Steve Charles, immixGroup Co-founder

If you’re a top-tier cyber-services firm in the federal market, the General Services Administration’s new cyber Special Item Numbers (SIN) within IT Schedule 70 are for you.

Adding cyber-related services to your schedule contract under these new SINs will be different. GSA, with technical people from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), will put your company through an oral cyber-scenario evaluation for each SIN:

  • Penetration testing (132-45A)
  • Incident response (132-45B)
  • Cyber hunt (132-45C)
  • Risk and vulnerability assessment (132-45D)

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What Really is the Future of Cloud?

Chris Wiedemann_65 x 85FEF photoBy Chris Wiedemann, Consultant

There’s a real chance that 5-10 years from now, the way we deliver technology to government will fundamentally change. We just need to make sure we can maintain the same level of partnership and focus on the government mission, while providing the same level of choice in what the technology industry has to offer.

That was my answer to “What is the future of cloud?”—one of the many discussions among industry and government cloud experts at the recent Federal Executive Forum on Secure Cloud Computing in Government 2016. The radio program was broadcast on Federal News Radio with moderator Jim Flyzik directing the conversation.

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