What you need to know about Army’s IT modernization strategy

By Stephanie Meloni, senior consultant

The Army views multi-domain operations as the future operating concept it needs to gain a competitive advantage against adversaries.

Despite the possibility of receiving increased funding under a new administration, the Army will largely be focused on readiness, as opposed to modernization. Readiness ensures that soldiers have proper training and equipment, while modernization would mean investing in new capabilities and technologies.

The good news for the IT industry is that multi-domain operations is a concept that addresses both modernization and readiness. And it will ultimately help the warfighter out-maneuver adversaries in land, cyber and intelligence. (You can hear more in my recent on-demand webinar on the Army’s IT Modernization Plan.)

Implementing multi-domain operations will entail significant changes to enterprise architecture and networking infrastructure to give the Army the flexibility it needs when it comes to configuration management and data sharing. This concept is all about data integration—and performing analysis on the data itself. Here are some ways the Army will be using its data to improve operations:

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Technology’s risky. Can this security solution help?

Lloyd McCoy Jr.The recent media coverage about data leaks and breaches  and government surveillance has so much to do with privacy, security and access. We might as well as get comfortable with security as a major challenge given that people aren’t ready to part with their mobile devices and the convenience of being able to work wherever they want.

At the same time, business interest in the internet of things, especially in government agencies is growing.  But security in IoT is still a major hurdle, causing some agencies to pump the brakes a bit.

So where does that leave the tech sector? There may be a continuing stream of risk, but there’s also opportunity, especially for companies with Identity Access Management (IAM) solutions that can address some of these valid security concerns.

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Can collaboration save us from cyber attacks?

By Tim Larkins, director of Market Intelligence

By 2020, businesses will experience $3 trillion in economic loss due to cyber attacks globally. Seventy-four percent of the world’s businesses expect to be hacked this year. If that’s not a crisis, I don’t know what is.

If you were one of 45,000 people who attended the RSA conference last month in San Francisco, you likely picked up on a few common themes related to this cyber crisis. Thought leaders and industry experts seemed to agree that we need more collaboration between companies, governments and associations in developing standards, policies and regulations for both cybersecurity and the internet of things.  We need more threat intelligence sharing, and some even advocated for creating an entire government agency dedicated to cybersecurity and IoT.

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DOD and IoT: 2 ways industry can help right now

Stephanie Meloni_65x85By Stephanie Meloni, consultant

If you’ve been attending industry events and keeping up with the news, you’ve surely been hearing buzz about the internet of things (IoT).

And if the DOD is part of your sales territory, you’re probably hearing how important it is to get IoT right, particularly when it comes to securing connected devices. But there hasn’t been a lot of action behind those words.

Many civilian agencies like the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Commerce have already released strategic documents and plans for IoT, but the Department of Defense has yet to release an official strategy.

Even so, government customers across DOD are giving thought as to how to handle IoT, and in some ways, are already implementing projects. So how can technology companies get involved as this trend continues to pick up steam?

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Can IoT really make cities smart?

Kevin Shaker_65 x 85By Kevin Shaker, analystsmartcities_011217

A little over a year ago, the Department of Transportation launched its Smart City Challenge, which pulled together federal grant money and private funds to restructure and optimize city transportation infrastructures across the country. Now that the winning cities have been announced, companies with Internet of Things solutions may want to start conversations about what they can offer.

Denver, San Francisco, Pittsburgh and Portland have been awarded grants to implement their IoT plans for establishing the cities of tomorrow. In October 2016, DOT identified these finalist cities, along with non-profit grants totaling $500 million for revamped frameworks. DOT has also committed $100 million for research, development and implementation of automated technologies.

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How to get a piece of the $7B IoT market

Lloyd McCoy Jr.summit-iot

By Lloyd McCoy Jr., DOD manager

Government adoption of the Internet of Things (IoT) is no longer a pipe dream. Approximately $7 billion is being spent annually on related hardware and software, according to a session at immixGroup’s recent Government IT Sales Summit.

As public sector adoption grows, so too is the often overlooked need to ensure the technology is managed effectively, said speakers on the Uniting Cybersecurity, Mobility and the Internet of Things panel. Industry needs to come to government with a plan on how an entire lifecycle process needs to be put in place so that security, reliability and usability are maintained.

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New IoT Security Principles On the Way

Tom O'Keefeiot-security_blog090816By Tomas O’Keefe, Consultant

If you want to look for a growing area of investment in federal IT, look no further than securing the Internet of Things (IoT).

There’s been a lot of recent talk about the IoT, with one of the latest conversation led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at an August 31st workshop to help industry get a grasp on the roadmap the federal government is pursuing in the coming year. IoT leaders across federal agencies will outline strategic principles that will guide near-and-long term purchasing decisions in securing internet-connected devices.

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