Omnibus signed into law–now what?

Chris Wiedemannfederal budget, fiscal year, procurementBy Chris Wiedemann, consultant

Despite some last-minute dramatics, President Trump signed a $1.3 trillion omnibus appropriations bill into law last Friday, fully funding the government for the rest of fiscal year 2018.

Of course, with any bill this size (over 2,200 pages in total), it takes a while to fully digest the implications for our customers and industry.

That said, it’s never too early to pull out some early highlights – to wit:

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Can data be protected through shared services?

Lloyd McCoy Jr.

By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

Any guesses on how much data is generated every year by government and government-related apps? More than 1,000 billion bytes. It’s a staggering number.

Naturally you wonder how is all of that data protected? How do we protect the information that makes our electric grid, air traffic, voting processes and other government-controlled functions keep working safely and reliably?

One obvious answer is to improve the way services are shared between government agencies – and between government and private industry.

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How to capture more IT business from HHS in FY18

Chris Wiedemann

By Chris Wiedemann, consultant

I have worked with immixGroup’s suppliers and partners on a wide range of federal agencies and their IT requirements and buying patterns. And one department consistently stands out as the most commonly asked about: Health and Human Services (HHS).

Diving into the numbers makes it clear why. At $13.8 billion, HHS’s top line IT budget is several times bigger than other large non-defense agencies. And although most of that money goes straight out the door in the form of grants to state and local agencies, the remainder still makes HHS the largest non-defense IT agency in government.

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Is this the new way of modernizing old systems?

Chris WiedemannMGT Act, tech modernization

By Chris Wiedemann, consultant

If you attended the Civilian FY18 Federal Budget Briefing at immixGroup’s most recent Government IT Sales Summit, one theme should have resonated throughout: the new ways government agencies are approaching the old problem of legacy system modernization.

It can be challenging to separate rhetoric from action sometimes, but there’s real energy in government around addressing the challenges of technology overhauls. Agencies are taking a customer-centric approach to design and development, with agile methodologies and human-centric design really becoming deep-rooted in civilian IT groups – and, perhaps more importantly, they’ve gotten an assist from Congress in the form of the Modernizing Government Technology (MGT) Act, which was signed into law as part of the FY18 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

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What you need to know about Army’s IT modernization strategy

By Stephanie Meloni, senior consultant

The Army views multi-domain operations as the future operating concept it needs to gain a competitive advantage against adversaries.

Despite the possibility of receiving increased funding under a new administration, the Army will largely be focused on readiness, as opposed to modernization. Readiness ensures that soldiers have proper training and equipment, while modernization would mean investing in new capabilities and technologies.

The good news for the IT industry is that multi-domain operations is a concept that addresses both modernization and readiness. And it will ultimately help the warfighter out-maneuver adversaries in land, cyber and intelligence. (You can hear more in my recent on-demand webinar on the Army’s IT Modernization Plan.)

Implementing multi-domain operations will entail significant changes to enterprise architecture and networking infrastructure to give the Army the flexibility it needs when it comes to configuration management and data sharing. This concept is all about data integration—and performing analysis on the data itself. Here are some ways the Army will be using its data to improve operations:

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3 important IT trends to watch in 2017—Part II

Chris Wiedemann_65 x 85civ2017_010517By Chris Wiedemann, consultant

It happens every time a new president takes the reins: People pontificate on what life will be like with the new administration.

Like most business sectors, the Trump administration’s potential effects on the government IT industry is a mystery. But there’s a safe bet that certain public sector IT priorities, like cloud, cybersecurity, analytics and overall IT modernization, will remain the same. You’ll see similar trends at the Department of Defense and the military branches.

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DISA at the Center of Pentagon’s IT Modernization Plans

Lloyd McCoy_65x85by Lloyd McCoy Jr., Consultant

Despite its relatively small size within DOD, the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has an outsize role in the Pentagon’s IT initiatives. When it comes to technology, DISA’s efforts are structured around four strategic goals:

  • Evolve the Joint Information Environment
  • Provide Joint Command and Control
  • Operate and Assure the Enterprise
  • Optimize Department Investments

These goals are in keeping with DISA’s role as the purveyor of command and control systems, enterprise infrastructure, and storage for the Department. DISA’s mission also places it in the unique position of be in the center of every facet of the Pentagon’s overall IT modernization goals and thus a key insertion point for the product community. DOD CIO Teri Takai’s “10-Point Plan for IT Modernization” is aimed at meeting the Department’s IT challenges and is a key facet of its overall goals of cutting waste and saving money. Several of those modernization goals with DISA’s role in them are as follows:

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