Technology’s risky. Can this security solution help?

Lloyd McCoy Jr.The recent media coverage about data leaks and breaches  and government surveillance has so much to do with privacy, security and access. We might as well as get comfortable with security as a major challenge given that people aren’t ready to part with their mobile devices and the convenience of being able to work wherever they want.

At the same time, business interest in the internet of things, especially in government agencies is growing.  But security in IoT is still a major hurdle, causing some agencies to pump the brakes a bit.

So where does that leave the tech sector? There may be a continuing stream of risk, but there’s also opportunity, especially for companies with Identity Access Management (IAM) solutions that can address some of these valid security concerns.

Read more of this post

Can data save state and local governments?

Rachel Eckertblog-sledanalyticsBy Rachel Eckert, SLED consultant

While the tumultuous situation in Washington is throwing a wrinkle into state and local politics, governments will continue to face a lack of funding and siloed operations. These two problems aren’t necessarily independent of each other, though. Siloed operations can create financial nightmares in the form of duplicative efforts and inefficient uses of data.

This was among the topics of discussion during last week’s Outlook 2017 event, organized by Governing Magazine.

Duplicative efforts and inefficiencies spell disaster for constrained budgets, which are already struggling to adequately fund education and public safety as Medicaid takes over an ever larger share of their budgets.

Read more of this post

Can IoT really make cities smart?

Kevin Shaker_65 x 85By Kevin Shaker, analystsmartcities_011217

A little over a year ago, the Department of Transportation launched its Smart City Challenge, which pulled together federal grant money and private funds to restructure and optimize city transportation infrastructures across the country. Now that the winning cities have been announced, companies with Internet of Things solutions may want to start conversations about what they can offer.

Denver, San Francisco, Pittsburgh and Portland have been awarded grants to implement their IoT plans for establishing the cities of tomorrow. In October 2016, DOT identified these finalist cities, along with non-profit grants totaling $500 million for revamped frameworks. DOT has also committed $100 million for research, development and implementation of automated technologies.

Read more of this post

What you need to know about selling to state and local in 2017

SLED, outsourcing, data centers, data storage

Eliminating data center management will be key for state and local government in 2017.

Rachel EckertBy Rachel Eckert, consultant

The state and local government IT landscape is ever-changing as it grapples with shrinking budgets and expanding responsibilities. But there’s one overarching trend tech companies selling to the state and local market can profit from in 2017: shrinking technology portfolios.

Eliminating technology from state and local government doesn’t sound like it would bode well for industry, but if government tech organizations focus on more long-term and strategic IT efforts, they’ll shift the balance away from maintaining their technology portfolios and more towards innovating. That means they’ll be looking for companies for that maintenance help – read “outsourcing.”

Read more of this post

How cloud and SaaS will drive SLED

Rachel Eckertblog-summit-sled-imageBy Rachel Eckert, SLED consultant

I’ve written about the importance of segmenting the State and Local and Education (SLED) markets for scalability and marketability, but do you know what to market?

Each market segment has its own unique set of issues, trends, and drivers, and knowing what those issues are is key to targeting your sales efforts.

Read more of this post

Philly’s Cloud-First Plans Delayed…For Now

Rachel EckertPhiladelphia, cloud, Charles Brennan, IT infrastructure, SLEDBy Rachel Eckert, SLED Consultant

It was nearly a year ago that I blogged about Philadelphia’s mission to become a cloud-first city. The CIO at the time, Adel Ebeid, said the goal was to host 30 percent of the city’s IT infrastructure in the cloud—primarily through SaaS delivery.

But as state and local governments know all too well, plans around technology don’t always come together.

Philly’s cloud plans have been put on ice as officials tackle ongoing projects and a struggling procurement system. The new CIO, Charles Brennan, has made a few changes to the city’s technology teams, including separating Open Data and Web Services roles.

He’s also indicated an interest in more open data, tackling the city’s aging IT infrastructure, and reworking the procurement system.

Read more about my take on Philly’s plans in StateScoop.

I’m also presenting a state and local market overview at immixGroup’s 3rd Annual Government IT Sales Summit on Nov. 17 in Reston, Va. Early bird ticket prices end soon, so register soon.

Are Local Governments Missing a Major Tech Trend?

Rachel EckertCountiesSurvey_080416By Rachel Eckert, SLED Consultant

One of the biggest surprises to come out of the Center for Digital Government’s 2016 Digital Counties Survey was a noticeable absence of cloud computing.

While cloud was present in the 2015 results at No. 10, it fell below this year. Half of county respondents reported that 10 percent or less of their systems have migrated to the cloud, only a slight increase of 3 percent over last year.

Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: