How and where to do business in the Navy: Part II

Lloyd McCoy Jr.By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

The Marine Corps will utilize a major portion of Navy’s IT budget for everything from cyber and incident response tools to data visualization and analytics.Here is part II of our breakdown of the Navy’s IT focus areas through FY18 and the best ways the private sector can generate new leads. (If you missed part I, click here.)

The Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) is the acquisition command for the U.S. Marine Corps. In my conversations with the service, a consistent refrain is that it wants to take capabilities that exist on a camp or garrison to the battlefield. So the Marine Corps is looking for technologies that are lightweight, flexible and that can be used at the lowest levels.

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How and where to do business in the Navy: Part I

Lloyd McCoy Jr.

By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

One of the biggest priorities of the Trump administration is a boost to the Department of Defense budget, specifically a substantial expansion of the Navy’s fleet. While a detailed FY18 budget is forthcoming, Navy commanders and program managers have recently been vocal about their priorities.

In this two-part series, I’ll break down the major insertion points within Navy and the Marine Corps and highlight what matters to the tech community, specifically the major drivers for IT spending through FY18.

First, let’s explore some of the commands and program offices that handle everything from aviation to information warfare.

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What you need to know about Army’s IT modernization strategy

By Stephanie Meloni, senior consultant

The Army views multi-domain operations as the future operating concept it needs to gain a competitive advantage against adversaries.

Despite the possibility of receiving increased funding under a new administration, the Army will largely be focused on readiness, as opposed to modernization. Readiness ensures that soldiers have proper training and equipment, while modernization would mean investing in new capabilities and technologies.

The good news for the IT industry is that multi-domain operations is a concept that addresses both modernization and readiness. And it will ultimately help the warfighter out-maneuver adversaries in land, cyber and intelligence. (You can hear more in my recent on-demand webinar on the Army’s IT Modernization Plan.)

Implementing multi-domain operations will entail significant changes to enterprise architecture and networking infrastructure to give the Army the flexibility it needs when it comes to configuration management and data sharing. This concept is all about data integration—and performing analysis on the data itself. Here are some ways the Army will be using its data to improve operations:

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Technology’s risky. Can this security solution help?

Lloyd McCoy Jr.The recent media coverage about data leaks and breaches  and government surveillance has so much to do with privacy, security and access. We might as well as get comfortable with security as a major challenge given that people aren’t ready to part with their mobile devices and the convenience of being able to work wherever they want.

At the same time, business interest in the internet of things, especially in government agencies is growing.  But security in IoT is still a major hurdle, causing some agencies to pump the brakes a bit.

So where does that leave the tech sector? There may be a continuing stream of risk, but there’s also opportunity, especially for companies with Identity Access Management (IAM) solutions that can address some of these valid security concerns.

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Can data overload in the IC be tamed?

By Mark Wisinger, senior analyst

In an era with more sensors and data than ever before, how can intelligence agencies separate the significant data from the background noise?

Data management is an enormous challenge right now in the Department of Defense and Intelligence Community, especially as the internet of things emerges onto the scene. The big data challenges are linked hand-in-hand with cloud implementation, insider threats and cybersecurity, business intelligence and traditional IT infrastructure.

This data management challenge is an opportunity for big data vendors, with defense and intelligence agencies looking to the private sector for solutions in data access and search, data labeling and filtering and other management needs.

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What government needs to do to speed up cyber defenses

Lloyd McCoy Jr.By Lloyd McCoy, DOD manager

Two cyber breaches at the Office of Personnel Management in 2015 prompted the federal government to move quickly to award $500 million worth of government-wide BPAs for identity monitoring and data breach response and protection services.

It begs the question of where that money was before the problem.

More problems like this are increasingly likely as we all rely on more IT infrastructures that may not be up to the challenge of increased use. Down the road, better coordination between tech vendors and buyers before the acquisition process will be able to stem the cyber tide. But what do we do in the meantime with what we have now?

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3 trends to watch at the VA in 2017

As the only civilian agency with a new FY17 appropriation, the Department of Veterans Affairs would have been a high-profile sales target even without the attention paid to it on the campaign trail. However, between reorganizations, new programs and budgetary tug-of-war contests, it can be difficult to figure out where exactly you need to sell.

Here are three trends to watch in the next year as the administration’s priorities take shape. You can hear more on the department in my recent webinar, IT Sales Opportunities at the VA: Everything You Need to Know but Were Afraid to Ask:

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